Top 10 Inspirational Books For Nurses

Nursing is the profession where they experience workload and stress on a regular basis during their long hour shifts. This results in emotional burnout and in the end, you left with no clue about how to get rid of that tiredness and emotional enervation.

To overcome your emotional, mental and physical exhaustion and tiredness, you can indulge yourself in reading self-help books. You don’t have to be nerdy to read a book. Isn’t there a time when you read a book and got so addicted to it? Reading self-help books will help you to reduce stress levels and it also helps you to work better and efficiently. There are many books available to buy which have its own benefits and added advantages from a nurse’s perspective. So, here is a list of books that nurses must read to advance their knowledge and also it helps to refresh your mind:

1. Inspired Nurse” by Rich Bluni

Rich Bluni is a registered nurse (RN) with 21 years of experience in patient safety and nursing. With his experience in a wide range of areas such as Trauma Intensive Care (TICU), Pediatric Intensive Care (PICU), and Emergency Medicine he is enough aware of both the benefits and the other negative sides connected with the nursing field. The book has centered on the fact that sometimes nurses care for patients too much that they forget to take care of them. In each chapter, the stories are tied with fellow nurses’ experiences in their daily life, and this book also teaches you to be grateful for all you do for others and deeply inspires you to restore your strength on your hard days.

2. The Everything New Nurse Book” by Kathy Quan

As a new nurse,  you’re starting your career in one of the most rewarding and at that same time a highly challenging field. You may nervous about stepping into a world of medical facilities.  Kathy Quan’s “The Everything New Nurse Book” addresses all your concerns and it’s a must-read for you. This book is an exceptional source for new nurses, as this book addresses all the typical situations that nurses encounter during their first years and how to handle them and all.

3. When Nurses Hurt Nurses: Recognizing and Overcoming the Cycle of Bullying” by Cheryl Dellasega

As a nurse, at least there might be a time, where you may have gone through that disagreements and arguments between your co-workers. There may be bullying, disagreements, stressful situations and all. Bullying is still has been crawling around nursing homes and hospital facilities for a long time, and this brings the facts and bullying around the nursing field into the homes of all who read it. Knowing how to spot it and how to handle the situations gives nurses the courage to diffuse such situations.

4. Cooked: An Inner City Nursing Memoir” by Carol Karels

Carol Karels’s book “Cooked: An Inner City Nursing Memoir” shows the real struggles of being a nurse in the drug-infested part of the city in Chicago during the ’70s.  This book shows how the author and some other fellow nurses fare in a city public health environment where faith, love, and laughter can exist notwithstanding racism, starvation, and neglect. This book is a memoir to open your eyes to dark sides of life your fellow nurses have gone through.


5. Nursing Diagnosis Handbook: A Guide to Planning Care” by Betty J. Ackley and Gail B. Ladwig

This book is a great resource for every nurse for planning the healthcare treatments you will be carrying out for your patients. This book covers a broad range of diseases and situations where careful planning is much needed and walks you through the steps to develop and carry out a perfect healthcare plan. Unlike offering a set of pre-written patient care plans, this book helps nurses to write their own patient health care plans, so they will be always well prepared to do so to suit any situation.

6. I Wasn’t Strong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse” by Lee Gutkind

Do you remember your daily nursing routines and the patients you have treated and your role in helping them? The first time you have checked someone’s chart or took their blood samples? How can one forget right! This book is an excellent one to recall many memories, to help remind you, you aren’t alone out there to handle such crazy situations.  These real-life stories will bring a lot of good memories of your nursing life and help you to remind why you should stick with nursing and go back every day to take care of your patients.

7. Your 1st Year as a Nurse” by Donna Cardillo

There is no doubt that nursing is a highly rewarding profession, but it can be tiresome at that same time. “Your 1st Year as a Nurse” is a great book by Donna Cardillo to guide you through your first year as a nurse. To become a nurse of our dreams, we have to study which is relevant to the field, it may be a degree in ADN, MSN, RN to BSN nursing, and we have to go through the clinical duties, the long hour shift, and all. This book covers all the difficulties of being a nurse and how to overcome them.”

8. Stuck Up! 100 Objects Inserted and Ingested in Places They Shouldn’t Be” by Rich E. Dreben, Murdoc Knight, and Marty A. Sindhian

This book is filled with true stories of patients who stuck certain things in their special places. The motive behind this book is basically humor and an attempt to look at the daily life of busy nursing life. It’s a good reminder to everyone that, although a severe condition, some things we can laugh at in the end.

9.Health Assessment & Physical Examination” by Mary Ellen Zator Estes

If you want to get a practical summary of basic healthcare that any nurses need to provide to the patients, then this book is a must. It describes everything with great examples and pictures. This book includes information on patient instruction guidelines, clinical examination techniques, and focuses on the patient as a human being.

10. Saving Lives: Why the Media’s Portrayal of Nurses Puts Us All At Risk” by Sandy Summers

Sandy Summers’s book is a must-read to understand what nurses do for you! The book is filled with many busters concerning how the media and its view put on nursing. This book also provides informative tips for nurses to get through these types of situations.


The Difference between a General Pediatrician and a Developmental Pediatrician

A mother and a boy walk hand in hand for a morning appointment. First, they stopped by the child’s favorite restaurant to have some breakfast. While the child roams around the restaurant with very high energy for a typical morning, his mother prepares his food on a plate. She calls the child and he comes rushing—bumping the table—and the glass of water spilled. After eating, they proceed to the second floor of the building and enter the clinic of the boy’s pediatrician for his regular check-up. The doctor performs his routine and asks many questions while the boy’s energy is still high. The doctor’s eyebrows slightly creased. After almost an hour of questioning and check-up, with a soft voice and calm manner, the pediatrician advised that they must see a developmental pediatrician.

This suggestion might bother many caring mothers. Countless unsaid questions and worries about their children come to mind. Why see a developmental pediatrician? Is there something wrong with my child? Will my child be fine and normal as he or she grows? What do developmental pediatricians do? These are some of the many questions that run through a parent’s mind. Identifying the differences between a general pediatrician and a developmental pediatrician might answer some of these questions.

General Pediatrics vs Developmental Pediatrics

Care, diagnosis, and treatment of many medical conditions and concerns from infancy up to early adulthood are usually under the scope of general pediatricians. On the other hand, developmental-behavioral pediatricians or most commonly known as Developmental Pediatricians have advanced experiences and are well-trained in analyzing, determining, and providing treatment plans for numerous kinds of developmental problems and behavioral concerns of children. They are also trained to provide treatment sessions, document the progress and changes, and prescribe appropriate medication suitable to the child’s needs. They can also assist parents and families as the child goes through different levels of education.

Education

General Pediatricians and Developmental-Behavioral Pediatricians went to medical school and spent years acquiring the knowledge and skills needed for the field. Four years of study and a year of internship are the requirements in the United States. A medical student will have to choose whether he wants to further his studies by focusing on a subspecialty during the internship period. Medical students will, later on, be general pediatricians if they choose not to take up subspecialty; while medical students will, later on, be developmental-behavioral pediatricians if they choose otherwise and go through further three years of residency in the field of pediatrics in order to be equipped and skilled in diagnosing and treating any behavioral problems and concerns on the development of children. Both are medical doctors who graduated and passed a national licensure examination.

Functions

The general health and care of a child are under the scope of general pediatricians. They look into the child’s attributes such as social, mental, physical and behavioral, and they compare it to the attributes generally accepted as standard or norm. Should there be any differences, concerns, or delays, they refer it to developmental pediatricians. Specialists in the development and behavior of children are called developmental pediatricians. Some (but not limited to) examples of the conditions they diagnose and provide treatment plans for are: behavioral disorders like anxiety, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and depression; learning disorders such as dyslexia and writing problems; developmental incapacities like spina bifida, mental retardation, visual and hearing defects and cerebral palsy, habit disorders; developmental delays such as cognitive and speech; and regulatory problems such as sleep and feeding difficulties and toilet-training problems.

Knowing the difference between a general pediatrician and a developmental pediatrician can guide loving parents in choosing the appropriate medical practitioner that can properly address their child’s medical needs.